The Summer Triangle

Main objects: Altair, Deneb, Vega

One of the most famous and largest asterism of the summer months

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The Great Summer Triangle is an asterism that emits a triangular pattern on the northern hemisphere night sky, the most significant stars of which are Altair, Deneb and Vega, the brightest stars of Aquila, Cygnus and Lyra.

The Great Summer Triangle was popularized by British astronomer Sir Patrick Moore in the 1950s, although he did not use it for the first time, as many had already referred to the triangle.

In the summer, the Great Summer Triangle can be seen from Hungary all night, while from the second half of the spring period it can be seen in the early hours towards the eastern horizon. In the autumn months, star formation can be observed in the western sky until November, when it disappears from the observers of the northern hemisphere.

It is known as "Northern Triangle" in the southern hemisphere. In the southern waters of the Pacific, sailors are known as the "Triangle of Navigators". The sailors use it to get to know the South Pacific waters, up to the Hawaiian islands.

The Great Summer Triangle is perhaps one of the best known and greatest asterism in the summer sky. The word asterism is a group formed from the stars of the sky, unlike the official constellations. Interestingly, the Milky Way is cut through, and there is an apparent break, making it even more interesting.

Analyzing its stars, as you can see, Vega may not be 0.0 magnitude by chance. Astronomers have created a magnitude scale against this star. However, its brightness has changed compared to the scale: 0.03 magnitude. A white star that is twice the weight of our Sun, relatively close. 

The other nearby star is Altair. A much larger star than our central body is turning around its own axis in less than 10 hours.

Cuckoo in the asterism is Deneb, which rightly draws attention to its distance of 2,600 light-years, but with almost the same brightness. It's 200 times higher than our Sun. If it were in the Solar System, it would almost reach the Earth's course.

My photo is a single exposure to which I only used the kit lens. To prevent the star from moving, I placed the camera on the telescope's mount.

 


 

Name:

Summer Triangle

Constellation:

Aquila, Cygnus, Lyra, Sagitta, Vulpecula

Coordinates:

-

Type:

Asterism

Distance (ly):

Altair: 16, Deneb: 2 600, Vega: 25

Brightness:

Altair: 0.7m, Deneb: 1.3m, Vega: 0.0m

Apparent size:

38° x 23°

Observable:

Spring, summer, autumn

Date:

27/07/2017 21:25 UT

Total exposure time:

8 minutes

Location:

Tápióbicske, Pest, Hungary

Camera:

Nikon D3300 (unmodified)

Telescope:

-

Mount:

Sky-Watcher NEQ-5 Pro GoTo

Guiding:

-

Corrector:

-

Focal ratio, length:

f/3.8, 24 mm

ISO:

200

Light:

480 s

Dark:

-

Flat:

-

Bias:

-

Processing:

Adobe Lightroom, Adobe Photoshop

Annotation