Jupiter (14/03/2016)

Main Objects: Jupiter, Great red spot

I captured the hundreds of years of anti-cyclone

Jupiter
Jupiter in the Solar System

The largest planet in the Solar System has no solid surface. Jupiter is a gas planet with a solid core, a liquid metallic shell, and an atmosphere of hydrogen, helium and methane. It rotates around its own axis in just 9 hours 55 minutes. Even in small telescopes, it offers stunning visuals. Galileo Galilei observed the orbits of four large moons, attempting to refute the geocentric worldview.
 

When someone talks about Jupiter in a conversation, sooner or later everyone imagines the largest planet in the solar system. Not too hard to imagine: two brownish-reddish bands that surround the Jupiter equator. The southern lane is different from the northern one with a patch. The patch is not small, since its size is approximately the diameter of the Earth. Due to its size it is already noticeable with medium telescopes.
 

The patch also has a name, and once it has been given, we may think that it is something that is permanent and long-standing. Indeed! The oval-shaped phenomenon known as the Great Red Spot in professional circles is a hundreds of years old anticyclone. Its size and position fluctuate. It will probably rise a few kilometers higher than the surrounding clouds. The sad news is that this feature may disappear completely from Jupiter, even in our lives, as the size of the patch is rapidly decreasing, according to Hubble.
 

I captured the photo with my childhood Dobsonian reflector, which I was forced to take manually while collecting the frames. Despite my inexperience at the time, I think I've managed to take a decent photo of the giant planet, but of course, in the future, I'd like to serve Jupiter in a more detailed and flashy way.

Name:

Jupiter

Constellation:

Leo

Coordinates:

R.A. 11 h 15 m 23 s Dec. 06° 23′ 56″

Type:

Planet

Distance:

664 million km

Brightness:

-2.48m

Apparent size:

44"

Diameter:

139,822 km

Illuminated:

100%

Date:

14/03/2016 19:45 UT

Location:

Tápióbicske, Pest, Hungary

Camera:

Nikon D3300 (unmodified)

Telescope:

Sky-Watcher 200/1200 mm Dobson

Mount:

Altazimuth

Guiding:

-

Corrector:

-

Light:

1000 frame (best 20%)

Processing:

AutoStakkert2!, RegiStax6, Adobe Lightroom, Adobe Photoshop

Location